Finding Beauty in Myth and Mystery: Bipasha Sen Gupta, Indian Contemporary Artist | Wildlife Conservation Day

“If we can teach people about wildlife, they will be touched. Share my wildlife with me. Because humans want to save things that they love.”

— Steve Irwin

 

Q: Tell us about your journey as an artist. What inspired this artwork?

 A: Working with natural dyes and fibers has always fascinated me. I experimented with numerous natural dyes and paper before finding this magical element of tea, the most common substance found in our daily life. It gave me the results I wanted to produce and also left an element of mystery, which kept me in awe. It is my humble effort to be as close as I can to nature and working with tea stains gives me that experience.

 

The concept of mythological creatures came as far as from stories told by grandparents and the zeal to revive this intriguing culture of tales and folklore for the generations to come in a world where things are shelved, forgotten, or mechanized. The mystery and the myth that fascinates us all, for the element of awe these creatures create around us, and the traditions and culture they delve into, determine the history of mankind, its past and the present which I have brought to light with these works…it’s a journey just begun and there’s an ocean waiting there!

 Indian Mythology is one of the richest elements of the Indian Culture, which enriches it further and makes it unique. Different stories in Indian mythology have been passed from generation to generation either by word of mouth or through carefully stored scriptures. I endeavour  to bring forth the different elements of Indian mythology through a myriad of paintings, which will not only be educational but also make recreational. The interesting aspect here is that they are usually meant to convey subtle facts, rules, and maxims to guide our daily lives. The visuals I’ve created convey subtle maxims to life-defining paradigms. A key point to note is that there are usually multiple stories explaining the same mythological character. This is a result of the natural evolution the stories might have undergone in the process of being handed over from generation to generation for centuries.

Q: We would like to know about your experience with beauty & beauty rituals growing up?

 A: As a child, there were no cosmetics used as I grew up in the 70s and 80s era. Washing your hair with egg and putting a besan pack on the face was all I can actually recall. More stress I guess was given on a good diet and exercise for glowing skin.

Q: Could you tell us a few traditional beauty rituals & practices you practice or discovered through cultural influences or the women in your life?

A: I am an avid kajal fan. My grandma made pure ghee oil lamps and collected the soot onto a silver thali which she let us use in the eyes as kajal, and also a besan ubtan 3 times a week was compulsory!

Q: What is your definition of self-love, art & beauty?

A: I am a whimsical moody and wild aquarian who has always lived life on her own terms because I completely believe in my mantra "YOU ONLY LIVE ONCE". I believe beauty lies in the eyes of the beholder, it is a very strong but less understood phrase and art is me, you, and this beautiful world!

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